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Tampa Bay Buccaneers’ Bruce Arians on Brett Favre’s critique — Tom Brady and I are ‘fine’

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TAMPA, Fla. — Tampa Bay Buccaneers coach Bruce Arians said he does not care what people have to say about him pointing out quarterback Tom Brady‘s mistakes publicly after Sunday’s loss to the New Orleans Saints.

Arians has not shied away from calling out players in the media in the past, and he said Wednesday that he believes his relationship with Brady is healthy.

“Tom and I are fine. I don’t really care what other people think. So it’s just what he and I think,” Arians said Wednesday with a chuckle. “We left the stadium fine. We showed up today fine. There ain’t nothin’ to talk about.”

On Tuesday, Pro Football Hall of Famer Brett Favre said on his radio show, “The SiriusXM Blitz” with Bruce Murray, that unless the coach and quarterback have an understanding, calling out Brady publicly can lead to tension down the road.

“Getting to Bruce Arians’ comments, true or not, I think the last person you want to call out after the first game of the year is Tom Brady,” Favre said Tuesday. “Now, maybe they had a mutual truce going into the game, going into the season, ‘Hey, I’m going to be hard on you. I want the guys to know we’re going to treat you the same even though technically I’m not, so are you OK with it?’ If they have that truce, great. If not, I think you are barking up the wrong tree.”

After the game, Arians was asked about Brady’s two interceptions. He responded, “One was a miscommunication between he and Mike [Evans]. He thought Mike was going down the middle — it was a different coverage — Mike read it right. He should have been across his face, but Tom overthrew it. The other one was a screen pass with an outlet called. He threw the outlet and it was a pick-six. Bad decision.”

Arians corrected himself Monday, saying Evans was actually at fault for the first interception.

But Favre still took issue.

“Dissension could easily enter quickly,” said Favre, who has a unique perspective, having spent 16 seasons with the Green Bay Packers before going to the New York Jets in 2008 and Minnesota Vikings from 2009 to 2010. “Maybe the Saints didn’t do anything that they were not ready for other than we didn’t protect very well, Tom gets hit a couple of times, you get a little jittery, it happens.”

Arians has maintained close relationships with his quarterbacks, telling ESPN when he was first hired by the Bucs in 2019 that quarterbacks “become my sons.” He even joked that getting a little too close with Ben Roethlisberger was one of the reasons he got fired by the Pittsburgh Steelers. He goes golfing with his quarterbacks. He invites them to his lake house in Georgia. And he believes in having an open and honest relationship with them.

But he also believes in holding them accountable, just like all his players, which is why he’ll put their names on weekly accountability sheets. It’s also why he cursed Brady out in a walk-through early in camp.

“He gets cussed out like everybody else,” Arians said of Brady during camp, adding, “He likes to throw the ball in walk-throughs, and we don’t throw the ball in walk-throughs.” Brady responded on Twitter, “I’m used to it!” with a laughing emoji. Brady isn’t a stranger to hard coaching. He’s been cursed at by Bill Belichick in training camp practices. He got into a shouting match with former offensive coordinator Bill O’Brien.

What separates Arians from other coaches is that he avoids coachspeak and tends to be more candid with the media. If he thinks a player is underperforming or that the players around him need to step up, he’ll say so. Still, he’s showered Brady with praise. He abides by mentor Bear Bryant’s philosophy of “Coach them hard, hug them later.”

Favre thinks that Arians should abide by Belichick’s methods of keeping things in-house.

“Bruce Arians is the head coach, he’s gonna do it the way he wants to do it — and I’m not saying that it’s right or wrong — but what’s happened in New England for so many years is that it worked,” Favre said. “And I’m not saying that it’s the right formula, but it certainly is one of the right formulas. I just don’t see any good that comes out of calling your quarterback out.

“And we’re not just talking about a quarterback — we’re talking about the biggest acquisition maybe in football history. I don’t care if he’s 43, or 33 or 21. Say collectively, ‘We’ve gotta play better, from quarterback to kicker, we’ve gotta play better, we’ve gotta coach better. In order to get where we want to go, that’s what we’re gonna have to do.’ And leave it at that.”

As far as the public writing Brady and the Bucs off after one game, Arians said Wednesday, “I was amused when they handed us the Lombardi trophy in July. But, yeah, it’s part of the business. You go with it. It’s one week at a time, one day at a time. We win a few games, everybody will be back on the bandwagon, happy [laughs]. It’s just part of the game.”

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Texans fall to 0-3, and their troubles aren’t going away – Houston Texans Blog

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While they were more competitive in their Week 3 loss to the Pittsburgh Steelers than they had been through two games, the Houston Texans’ early-season weaknesses continued to be on display.

Houston, which fell to 0-3 with a 28-21 loss, struggled to run the ball on offense, stop the Steelers’ rushing attack in the fourth quarter and protect Deshaun Watson. Watson displayed some of his patented playmaking ability, but he was sacked late in the game on a critical drive by T.J. Watt and was forced to scramble more than he’d like to.

The Texans have had the NFL’s toughest schedule through three weeks, but that won’t make recovering from a three-game losing streak to open the season any easier.

QB breakdown: Watson completed 19 of 27 passes for 264 yards with two touchdowns and an interception, but the majority of his success came in the first half. The Texans were shut out in the second half for the first time in the last three seasons. Watson spread the ball around early and had five different players (running back David Johnson, receivers Brandin Cooks, Kenny Stills and Randall Cobb and tight end Jordan Akins) catch a pass of at least 20 yards in the first half of a game for the first time in franchise history.

Troubling trend: For the second week in a row, the Texans’ running game was not effective. Houston combined for 29 yards on 15 carries, led by Johnson, who had 23 yards and a touchdown on 13 carries. There were plenty of times on Sunday when Johnson didn’t have much of a chance with a Steelers defender making contact with him in the backfield.

Troubling trend II: Through three games, the Texans still don’t have a takeaway. And in all three games, Houston has turned the ball over to lose the takeaway battle. Defensive coordinator Anthony Weaver and head coach Bill O’Brien have talked about the importance of forcing turnovers, but don’t have anything to show for it in three weeks According to ESPN Stats & Information, this game ended the Steelers’ streak of 25 consecutive games with a turnover.

Troubling trend III: Run defense in the fourth quarter. A week after allowing 153 rushing yards in the fourth quarter to the Baltimore Ravens, Houston’s defense again couldn’t get off the field in Pittsburgh. On Sunday, the Steelers were led by James Conner, who had 109 yards and a touchdown on 18 carries and Anthony McFarland had 42 rushing yards on six attempts. Conner averaged 9.3 yards per rush in the fourth quarter.

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Follow live: Raiders' Gruden searching for first win vs. Belichick's Patriots

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San Francisco 49ers lose TE Jordan Reed, CB Emmanuel Moseley vs. New York Giants

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Add two more key players to the San Francisco 49ers‘ ever-expanding list of injuries.

Tight end Jordan Reed (knee, ankle) and cornerback Emmanuel Moseley (concussion) suffered injuries in the first half of the team’s game against the New York Giants on Sunday. The team ruled Reed and Moseley out for the rest of the game at halftime.

Reed suffered an apparent left leg and ankle injury with 1:13 left in the first when he attempted to drag his feet in the back of the end zone on a throw from quarterback Nick Mullens. Reed was unable to make the catch and immediately grabbed for his left leg as he tumbled to the ground. Reed’s departure left Ross Dwelley and Charlie Woerner as the Niners’ only healthy remaining tight ends.

Moseley’s injury happened on the first play of the second quarter as he and safety Jaquiski Tartt converged on Giants quarterback Daniel Jones after a 19-yard run. Tartt and Moseley collided with Moseley taking the worst of it. Dontae Johnson replaced Moseley.

The loss of Reed and Moseley only added to San Francisco’s lengthy list of injury issues. Defensive end Dee Ford (back), quarterback Jimmy Garoppolo (ankle), linebacker Dre Greenlaw (quadriceps), tight end George Kittle (knee) and running back Raheem Mostert (knee) were all pregame inactives after suffering injuries last week against the Jets, a game also played at MetLife Stadium.

The Niners are also without running back Tevin Coleman (knee), receiver Richie James Jr. (hamstring), receiver Deebo Samuel (foot) and cornerback Richard Sherman (calf), all of whom are on injured reserve but expected to return in the coming weeks.

Defensive end Nick Bosa, defensive tackle Solomon Thomas and wideout Jalen Hurd are all out for the season with torn anterior cruciate ligaments.

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