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Who’s savage now? In this new rivalry, Astros own the Yankees

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The demise of the New York Yankees can be traced to a conference room at the old Pfister Hotel in Milwaukee, where baseball’s barons met in 2011 to realign divisions, expand the postseason and approve the $615 million sale of the Houston Astros to Jim Crane, who was awarded the club, at a $65 million discount, on one condition:

That his team becomes a card-carrying member of the American League.

The Astros had spent more than a half century in the National League before moving in 2013, and they trudged off to the AL West lugging with them a most uninspiring past. The Astros had won three playoff series and no World Series titles since they were born, as the Colt .45s, in 1962. The Yankees had won 30 playoff series and eight of their 27 World Series titles in those same 51 years.

In other words, after back-to-back seasons of more than 105 losses, the Astros were nowhere to be found on the House of Steinbrenner’s list of top 105 concerns for the balance of the decade. And yet there the Yankees were in Houston on Saturday night, down and out after Jose Altuve‘s walk-off homer off Aroldis Chapman, eliminated from the MLB playoffs by the Astros for the third time in the last five years.

This six-game American League Championship Series verdict was framed by profound big-picture implications. The Yankees have failed to reach the World Series for the 10th consecutive season, a biblical drought by any Bronx measure. The last time the Yanks had completed a decade without making a single World Series appearance, a man born almost five years before the start of the Civil War, Woodrow Wilson, was sitting in the Oval Office. Meanwhile, the Astros are heading to the Fall Classic for the second time in three years, looking to make the case that they will soon reign as the sport’s latest dynasty.

The Process > The Pinstripes.

Here’s the thing about this ALCS: The Yankees weren’t just beaten by a better team; they were beaten by a better program. Years after making a $15,000 investment in a 5-foot-6 Venezuelan teenager named Jose Altuve, the Astros built their program around first-round draft picks — George Springer, Carlos Correa and Alex Bregman — and their commitment to landing the two available starters, Justin Verlander and Gerrit Cole, who might have made the Yankees unstoppable.

Hal Steinbrenner didn’t want to take on Verlander’s money in the summer of 2017, and his general manager, Brian Cashman, didn’t want to trade Miguel Andujar and Clint Frazier for Cole, the former Yankees draft pick, in January of 2018. Those are two conspicuous reasons why today’s Yankees are looking a bit like yesterday’s Knicks, the consistent playoff participant that lost all five series it played against Michael Jordan’s Chicago Bulls between 1989 and 1996. (The Knicks beat the Jordan-less Bulls in 1994.) Jordan eliminated four different Knicks coaches in that period. His dominance of New York, of course, was easy to see coming.

The Astros’ dominance of New York? Not so much. They went 51-111 in 2013 to run their loss total to 324 games over three seasons, perfecting the art of tanking before Sam Hinkie could get his process-trusting hands on the Philadelphia 76ers. While torturing their fan base, the Astros drafted and developed enough talent to finally post a winning record in 2015, at 86-76, and to claim that extra wild-card spot added that same 2011 day the team was officially sold to Crane and booked for the AL.

Houston defeated the No. 1 wild card, the Yankees, in Yankee Stadium, with Dallas Keuchel and three relievers combining for the shutout that opened a one-way passion play that continued Saturday night. The Astros have now beaten the Yankees in a sudden-death wild-card game, in a Game 7 of the ALCS after being down 3-2 in the series, and in a Game 6 of the ALCS after being up 3-1 in the series. The Astros have now beaten the Yankees with Keuchel as their ace (2015), with Verlander as their ace (2017) and with Cole as their ace (2019).

The Astros have now beaten two Yankees teams managed by Joe Girardi and one managed by Aaron Boone.

“Damn Yankees” was a Broadway musical and movie. It doesn’t matter that “Damn Astros” doesn’t have the same ring to it.

The end result in this latest series seemed inevitable a couple of nights ago. After Thursday’s Game 4 disaster, shaped by a series of Little League errors and CC Sabathia’s grim farewell, the Yankees appeared to be waiting for the local coroner to declare them dead. Inside a home clubhouse about as still as a church at midnight, Aaron Judge quietly addressed reporters under a big-screen TV that relayed a message to players to report the following day at 3:30 p.m. “TRAVEL ATTIRE: TRACK SUITS,” the rest of the bulletin read.

Truth is, the Yankees didn’t look like they were preparing to play baseball in Houston. They looked like they were preparing to play golf back home.

Out of left field, they smacked two first-inning homers off Verlander in Game 5, sparing themselves the indignity of losing all three ALCS games in the Bronx and breathing life into Boone’s post-Game 4 forecast that “stranger things have certainly happened. A lot stranger.” Like the 2004 Yankees making history — a year after Boone’s Game 7 dagger against Boston — by losing four straight ALCS games to the haunted Red Sox, who exorcised more than eight decades’ worth of demons and doubts.

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The case for the Red Sox trading Mookie Betts — Examining Boston’s two paths forward

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This year’s tepid MLB stove season is dominated by talk of whether contending teams in Boston and Cleveland, both of which won their divisions in 2018 but missed the playoffs in 2019, might trade their best players — Mookie Betts and Francisco Lindor, respectively — now, before they reach free agency (next November for Betts and the following offseason for Lindor). Cleveland’s financial picture is its own set of problems, but Boston should have no issue whatsoever paying Betts — who seems to want to go to free agency — $30-plus million a year to spend the rest of his prime years with the Red Sox. There is, however, an argument for trading Betts now to address the organizational deficiency in starting pitching, even though it would mean trading their best and perhaps most popular player.

The Red Sox are not in a great competitive position right now; their rotation for 2020 depends on two veterans, Chris Sale and David Price, whose health and durability are both gigantic questions. Neither threw 150 innings last season; both had the worst ERAs of their careers and both ended the year on the injured list. Their healthy returning starters are Eduardo Rodriguez and … Nathan Eovaldi, if you are an optimist. The Red Sox had a 4.70 ERA last year, putting them at the league median, and would project to worse than that in 2020 unless they bring in a lot of outside help.

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Reliever Chris Martin back with Braves on 2-year, $14 million deal

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ATLANTA — Pitcher Chris Martin and the Atlanta Braves have agreed to a $14 million, two-year contract, a deal that brings the right-hander back after he closed 2019 with the club.

Martin, 33, was acquired by Atlanta from the Texas Rangers for left-hander Kolby Allard at the July 31 trade deadline.

Martin was 1-1 with a 4.08 ERA in 20 games with the Braves. He had 22 strikeouts and one walk in 17⅔ innings.

Martin will earn $7 million in each year of the deal and agreed to a provision to donate $70,000 annually to charity. His signing comes on the same day the Braves introduced left-hander Will Smith, who agreed to a $40 million, three-year contract.

The 6-foot-8 Martin has a 4.51 ERA in his big league career in 144 games, all in relief, with Colorado, the New York Yankees, Texas and Atlanta.

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MLB teams can trust these free agents over 30

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Looking at this year’s list of free agents, there are plenty of drool-worthy options at the top of the rankings. Gerrit Cole is one of the most valuable pitchers to become available in free agency. Anthony Rendon was a serious MVP candidate in 2019 and Stephen Strasburg isn’t that far behind Cole. Zack Wheeler and Hyun-Jin Ryu would fit near the top of most major league rotations.

However, not everyone is getting a star. Some teams are running up against salary issues — many of those limits being self-imposed, of course — and even if the willingness is there, there are a lot more teams than there are available stars. So there is going to be a lot of shopping at the bargain end of free agency. These players won’t carry a team to the postseason single-handedly, but they will likely contribute at a reasonable salary.

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