Connect with us

Cricket

Brendan Taylor’s wife mugged outside their home in Harare | Cricket

Published

on








Brendan Taylor raises his bat after a much-needed half-century, for both him and Zimbabwe © Getty Images


Zimbabwe cricketer Brendan Taylor‘s wife was mugged outside their home in Harare earlier this week, with Taylor posting about the incident via his Twitter account and urging residents of the city to remain vigilant amid reports of increased crime.

“Just had an alarming situation outside my house,” Taylor wrote. “I was waiting for my wife’s return in my driveway. I started hearing her screaming about 100m from my gate, she was getting mugged by 4 armed men. I ran outside and they sped away in red Honda Fit.”

Local media has reported an increase in crime in the country since the intensification of load-shedding in Harare this week, with criminals apparently taking advantage of the power failures in the capital city’s suburbs.

“Fortunately she only lost her handbag and it could of [sic] been a lot worse,” Taylor posted on Twitter. “People are getting desperate, be vigilant when entering your property and try keep off the roads after dark. With all this load shedding we’re easy targets.”

Avondale Police station, which is the station closest to Taylor’s house, has also taken to social media to urge residents of the area to be on high alert.

“We note with concern the crime activity in our area in the last 8 weeks,” read a message on the station’s social media page. “Unregistered vehicles continue to expose our community to crime and we now are appealing to all our Avondale residents and Security Structures, Neighbourhood Watches, Whatsapp Media Platforms to be on high alert for any suspicious individuals or vehicles.”

Liam Brickhill is ESPNcricinfo’s South Africa correspondent


©
ESPN Sports Media Ltd.






Source link

Continue Reading
Click to comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Cricket

‘Wouldn’t have been scoring like this if I didn’t take risks’ – Rohit backs his ODI method

Published

on


Rohit Sharma‘s batting at the top of the order in ODIs is a study in contrast to the methods in vogue at the moment, with batsmen preferring to attack hard early. Rohit is not averse to taking his time at the start and settling in, before exploding with greater force as the innings progresses.

India’s limited-overs vice-captain is the only man with multiple double-centuries in ODI cricket, having hit three including a world-record 264, and he explained that he had found a process that worked well for him.

“What works for me is what works for me. I’m going to stick to my plans. In those double hundreds that I have scored, you’ve got to see how many balls I had consumed by the time I reached my first 10 runs, the first 50 runs, the first 75-80 runs. It’ll rarely be five balls 10 runs, or 25 balls 50 runs,” Rohit told Times of India. “You know what I’m saying – but I’ve still got there. I’ve worked with certain trends and those trends have worked for me, in return. There will be days when I will get off to a flyer.

“Obviously when you’re chasing scores of 350 and 370, you’ll have to change gears as required. There’s not much time that one can take before he can get going. I get that. But you asked me about how I like to go about – to that, I’ll say, follow what suits you, go by the conditions, the opponents, the kind of attack that’s coming at you. So, let’s say much of that is an instinctive factor.”

The numbers bear out Rohit’s success with his method.

*All numbers from April 1, 2015 till May 24, 2019

Rohit’s acceleration during the course of an innings is evident. Among openers in the first ten overs, he is the second slowest, ahead of only Tamim Iqbal. From overs 10.1 to 35, and expanding the list to include batsmen in the top four, he is eighth among 61 batsmen. And in the last 15 overs, only AB de Villiers scores quicker than Rohit among 91 batsmen.

Rohit’s six-hitting ability also plays a part in his acceleration. Since the 2015 World Cup, he has hit 130 sixes for India, considerably more than the second-placed Virat Kohli’s 55.

“Listening to people, day in, day out, it’s something that I have learnt to live with,” Rohit said. “You step out of the house and the first guy you say hello to, hellos back: ‘Cover drive thoda aisa khel na. Straight drive sudhaar apna (Play the cover drive like this. Improve your straight drive).’ Kya karoon? (What do I do?). Listen and move on. One guy, I don’t even know him, gave me a 15-minute lecture on the pull shot. Don’t hit the ball in the air (laughs).

“What those people don’t understand is they know and recognise me as a cricketer because of those very shots. I wouldn’t have been scoring the kind of runs I did if I didn’t take those risks. For instance, just this week, someone shared an interesting stat with me. Post the 2015 World Cup, I’ve hit 130 sixes. The next best from India is 55. The margin of 75, you see, is the margin of risk I’ve taken. Simple.”



Source link

Continue Reading

Cricket

Monty Panesar opens up on mental health battles and hoping to play again | Cricket

Published

on








Monty Panesar bowls during his brief comeback with Northamptonshire © Getty Images


Former England spinner Monty Panesar has spoken in depth about his mental health issues, describing the shock of being diagnosed with “paranoia/schizophrenia”. The 37-year-old now believes he has put his problems behind him and remains hopeful that he can win a return to first-class cricket despite being without a club since 2016.

Panesar was an England regular during the mid-to-late 2000s but suffered from bouts of depression and drinking to excess. He was released by Sussex in 2013 after a late-night incident that involved urinating on a bouncer outside a club and although he was included on the subsequent Ashes tour, he played his final match for England during that year’s Boxing Day Test at the MCG.

Speaking to Nasser Hussain, the former England captain, in an interview with the Daily Mail, Panesar talked about his battle with depression and his hopes for a comeback. He revealed that he had consulted another former England captain Mike Brearley, who is also a qualified psychologist, about his mental health.

“My parents became worried,” he said. “They wanted me to see someone. I had always thought strong people couldn’t have a problem. I was always the guy who would win games, who had everything in order.

“My cricket had always gone the way I had planned it, but suddenly things started going in a direction I hadn’t experienced since childhood. It had all been up, up, up but this was new territory mentally.

“It was a guy called Peter Gilmore who said I was suffering from paranoia/schizophrenia and that shocked me massively. Mike Brearley told me to be careful about the things I was saying to myself. Some experts thought I’d never get better but I knew I could fight it, come through it.”

Having left Sussex, Panesar had further run-ins with the management at Essex, before returning for a brief spell at Northamptonshire, where he originally rose to England prominence. He has now written an autobiography, The Full Monty, detailing his experiences and said he is determined to give his playing career “one more go”.

“It was difficult,” he said. “Everyone was doubting me. I spoke to [former wicketkeeper turned mentor] Neil Burns and he told me everyone thought I’d gone off the rails. He told me there were so many rumours and I had to put the record straight. I tried to do a couple of interviews to get the message out that I’d had problems, but I was on the way back.

“Now the book will hopefully get everything out there. I love the game. I’m not a bad egg in the dressing room, I’m actually a nice guy. I want people to remember the good Monty, but it takes a while to eradicate bad memories. It’s like I’m a fireball and people are worried that if they get too close to me they’ll get burnt.

“I don’t need medication. I don’t drink. I don’t have good and bad days. All of those things have gone. There was a moment I was at Northampton about 18 months ago and I looked around and thought, ‘Wow, those paranoid thoughts are not there any more’. I knew then Monty was back. I’m going to be a cricketer again. I’m going to do it.”

©
ESPN Sports Media Ltd.






Source link

Continue Reading

Cricket

‘Very tough event for corruptors to come near’ – ICC ACU chief

Published

on


An officer from the ICC’s anti-corruption unit (ACU) will, for the first time, travel alongside each of the 10 participating teams in the World Cup. The move is part of the ACU’s drive to stave off the ever-increasing, ever-present danger of corrupt elements who have been frequently implicated in various sport-fixing scandals. However, the ACU is confident that the World Cup is “well protected”.

Alex Marshall, the ACU general manager, said that the advantage of having an officer from his unit travel with each team was to instill confidence among the players and support staff in reporting any approach from corruptors. “We have put an anti-corruption manager from my team with each of the squads, my people who work all around the world. Usually this is someone who has worked with the team anyway, goes on tour with them, knows all the players and support staff, and has a good relationship so they can report any concerns,” Marshall said at a media conference at the Oval on Friday.

Marshall said the exercise proved to be fruitful when ACU officers travelled recently with a few international teams. “It’s something we’ve used at some of the T20 events around the world, and being away from the ground, it just allows anti-corruption managers to get to know the entire squad very well.

“The person who’s with Bangladesh has been on tour with Bangladesh in recent months, knows all the players and all the squad. The person with Afghanistan has been on tour with Afghanistan, knows all the management, knows all the players. We’ve developed a much closer relationship with all the players and the squads, and having them (ACU officers) with them (the squad) throughout the whole of the World Cup just perpetuates that good relationship. The indicators that it’s working are the amount of reporting we’re getting from players.”

Unlike his predecessors, Marshall has been more open and aggressive in his stance and words with regards to sending a message to unscrupulous elements. The ACU has identified that the corruptors, having found it hard to tread around players, have been trying to influence people on the “edge” which includes support staff, selectors, administrators, and groundsmen. Recently the ACU charged several people in Sri Lanka, including former captain Sanath Jayasuriya, as part its wide-ranging and longstanding investigations into alleged match-fixing activities.

“We have put an anti-corruption manager from my team with each of the squads. Usually this is someone who has worked with the team anyway.”

Alex Marshall

Marshall said the ACU had identified about a “dozen” corrupt elements globally, whose images were being shared with all 10 teams as well as the UK police. “This World Cup will be very, very well protected by anti-corruption (unit) working with police, National Crime Agency and gambling organisations. You can never guarantee any event will be free of an issue – what I can say is that the corruptors know how well protected this event is, they know how professionally it’s run and we have an anti-corruption manager with every single squad, not just at the matches, but away from the matches looking out for these people. And it’s around a dozen people who have had the ‘disinvite’ to the Cricket World Cup 2019 and who we will keep away.

“If anymore pop up, we will be speaking to them as well. They are people who live all over the world, but the majority of the corruption we deal with has its origins in the sub-continent, unregulated betting markets.”

In an interesting move, Marshall said the ACU had reached out to some of the corruptors – through solicitors and direct communication in some cases – alerting them they would be barred from the World Cup as soon as they were spotted. Some wrote back saying they would not come to the tournament. “I have either written, called or Whatsapped all the corruptors and the other main corruptors we know operating around the world to tell them not to come anywhere near the World Cup. So far they have all promised me they are not coming. But sometimes with corruptors, you find they don’t always tell the truth. So we will be very proactive in keeping on top of them, keeping them away from the tournament.”

And that’s going to be enough to keep the corruptors away? “Who knows? I can’t actually prevent somebody getting on plane somewhere, but what I can do is keep communicating with the corruptors, tell them they are not invited to the World Cup, if they are seen here, at the ground, they will be thrown out. We have shared their details with the law enforcement and the police here in the UK – if our guys see them anywhere around the World Cup, they will be asked to leave.”

Marshall was confident the various safeguards put in place would make it really difficult for the corruptors to disrupt the World Cup. “When they look at the World Cup they see a very well organised, professional, well governed, well protected event. This is a very tough event for corruptors to come near.”



Source link

Continue Reading

Trending