Connect with us

NFL

Daryl Worley of Philadelphia Eagles arrested after allegedly being found passed out in vehicle

Published

on

Philadelphia Eagles cornerback Daryl Worley was arrested Sunday morning after he was allegedly found passed out inside a vehicle blocking a highway, according to NFL Network.

The Eagles confirmed Worley’s arrest and said they were “in the process of gathering more information.”

Though no decision has been made, the team is considering releasing Worley, according to ESPN’s Tim McManus and The Philadelphia Inquirer. Key decision-makers are set to discuss the matter Sunday, a source said.

According to NFL Network, Worley was tased during the 6 a.m. arrest after he allegedly became combative toward police. A gun was also found at the scene, according to the report, which added that the incident occurred near the Eagles’ team facility.

Worley was traded to the Eagles by the Panthers in March in a deal that sent wide receiver Torrey Smith to Carolina.

Source link

NFL

How Breonna Taylor’s killing inspires Eagles’ Jamon Brown to push for a ‘new world’

Published

on

As a proud Black man fed up with social injustice and a native of Louisville, Kentucky, loyal to his hometown, Philadelphia Eagles offensive guard Jamon Brown has taken the fatal shooting of Breonna Taylor to heart.

“We’ve been out here marching and protesting for a cause, for a movement, for a change. But right now, I’m here to tell you — look around you. Literally, look around you. People say ‘One day,’ and I say ‘Day 1.’ …Today in Louisville, Kentucky, we as a people have declared that we are all the same and that we as a people deserve the same justice. We deserve the same rights. We deserve the same opportunities of life.”

Those were the words the 6-foot-4, 340-pound Brown shouted through a bullhorn as he addressed thousands of masked supporters congregated in downtown Louisville on June 6 — the day after what would have been Taylor’s 27th birthday.

A man standing to Brown’s right threw a clenched fist in the air while nodding approval. The folks scattered along the front of the crowd stretched their cell phones high, attempting to capture every word of the passionate speech.

Brown was unaware he would be called upon to speak that day, but Christopher 2X, a Louisville-based, anti-violence activist, tapped him on the shoulder and said, “Brother, do it for Breonna’s mom.”

He did it for his divided city. He did it for a broken nation.

Brown, a former University of Louisville standout, marched in numerous Louisville protests during the months of June and July in memory of Taylor, a Black woman killed by Louisville police who served a no-knock warrant at her home in March. He addressed crowds of thousands on the same Metro Hall steps as Rev. Jesse Jackson did at the same event in pleading for unity and change during a racially charged time nationwide.

Although Taylor’s family was awarded a $12 million settlement on Tuesday from the city of Louisville in a wrongful death lawsuit, Brown still wants to know why the officers involved in her shooting haven’t been arrested.

“Still in the fight. Hush money won’t end this,” Brown said when asked if the settlement changed his stance about the case.

His next step will be an attempt to get answers directly from the FBI.

Brown is scheduled to participate in a conference call with the FBI’s Louisville field office at some point before the end of the month. Christopher 2X set up the call, which will include six others, including a retired Air Force general and doctoral and law students.

“It’s about making sure that the right light is shed and that they’re not able to just turn a blind eye to what’s going on,” Brown said. “At the end of the day, I can’t make people make decisions. All I can try to do is be the people’s voice to put people’s feet to the fire.”

Inside Brown’s perspective

Brown’s passionate stance stems from his upbringing. The 27-year-old has come a long way since battling poverty, bullying and brief homelessness growing up with his mother and two siblings in the predominantly Black West End of Louisville. He admitted possessing the mentality “not to always trust the pale face,” meaning white people. Some of it had to do with learning about slavery and segregation as a child. Some of it had to do with early encounters with racism.

“I remember running around with some friends in sixth grade — some white — and we were throwing rocks at abandoned houses and got caught by the police,” Brown recalled. “Of course, we weren’t supposed to be doing that, but only me and my twin brother got in trouble when we all should have gotten in trouble. The officers didn’t arrest us, but they put us in the car and took us home. Being in the back of a police car and [being reprimanded] as if it was just the Black kids and not the group who caused trouble, that’s what made it traumatizing.”

Brown, a self-proclaimed “angry Black kid,” said he was far from a model student. As a sophomore at Fern Creek High School, he said he nearly got into a physical altercation with a white teacher he believed singled him out because he was a Black athlete. Brown said that after he verbally committed to play football at Louisville, “Teachers who would throw out shady comments like, ‘Just because you committed to Louisville, that doesn’t mean you run stuff.’ Little smart comments like that would rub me the wrong way.”

In one case, the situation got heated.

“One teacher that I kind of — we really never agreed,” Brown said. “He said something like that to me one day. I got offended. I kind of swell up. We’re kind of chest to chest. Security is called. There was talk like, ‘Hey, he’s talking about pressing charges against you for intimidation. He said he doesn’t feel comfortable coming to work.’ I know that although I got upset, he did too. It was only a one-sided offense, and I was the offender at that point, when he really provoked me. And he never received any discipline for that.

“Those people kind of in power … to write the narrative. He wrote it in a light that made me seem like this big, angry Black man and didn’t shed the light on what provoked that anger. That’s when I learned: This is how life is. This is how this s— goes.”

Brown said people knew “he was a good-hearted kid” and that, coupled with football allowing him to take out his aggression in a positive manner, saved him. He started playing football at age 7. He became a high school defensive line standout and then decided to play for the hometown Cardinals over other schools such as Kentucky, Illinois and Purdue.

“I didn’t want those experiences to deter me from my dream,” said Brown, whom Louisville converted to a guard during his freshman year. “If I ran away from it, then I alter what I aspired to make happen for myself.”

After he made it to the NFL as a 2015 third-round pick of the St. Louis Rams, he established the Jamon Brown Foundation devoted to helping at-risk kids and the underprivileged in Louisville. He plans to use his platform to combat issues such as systemic racism, which he said he deals with even today.

“I haven’t been killed for it, but I’ve experienced being treated like I’m not supposed to be somewhere,” Brown said. “I have neighbors that act like I didn’t pay for my house like they paid for theirs. It’s white people that do that to me, and I hate to say that because I have so many white friends. I get random texts from white people saying, ‘I’m sorry that white America doesn’t understand.'”

Brown wants everyone to comprehend the magnitude of the injustice involved in Taylor’s killing. But he said it’s not just Taylor. It’s George Floyd. It’s Ahmaud Arbery. The list goes on.

“It’s too many Black lives that have been wrongfully taken,” Brown said. “There are so many other situations that have been swept under the rug. What you see now is people saying, ‘Enough is enough.'”

Holding the police accountable

Taylor had big plans for her future, working to become a full-time nurse after serving as an emergency room technician and a certified EMT. The circumstances behind her death infuriate Brown.

According to reports, Taylor was shot five times and killed inside her apartment on March 13 after plainclothes police officers forced their way in using a battering ram after midnight to serve a no-knock warrant, which allowed entry without warning or identifying themselves as law enforcement. Taylor’s boyfriend, Kenneth Walker, shot Sgt. Jonathan Mattingly in the leg, believing he was an intruder. Police returned fire.

No drugs were found. The target of the probe was not at the scene.

Detective Brett Hankison subsequently was fired. Retiring interim police chief Robert Schroeder said in Hankison’s termination letter that Hankison shot 10 rounds into Taylor’s apartment with actions that displayed “an extreme indifference to the value of human life.”

“We can simply hush things up by firing all the people involved and taking those three officers to trial,” Brown said.

The Louisville Metro Police Department declined to comment when contacted by ESPN, citing the ongoing investigation. Kentucky Attorney General Daniel Cameron released a statement saying there was no timetable for the investigation’s conclusion.

Taylor’s mother, Tamika Palmer, also declined an interview request. Brown shared several moments he had with Palmer during the Louisville protests.

“I told her that everybody is saying her name; everybody knows who Breonna Taylor is,” Brown said of his talks with Palmer. “As bad as it sounds, her daughter was the sacrificial lamb for change. You have people like myself — people who are in places of what people would call power — who are willing to do whatever it takes to make sure those who did wrong are held accountable.”

Brown said Taylor’s case feels personal to him because he believes it could have happened to a loved one, such as his mother or sister. He didn’t know Taylor personally but views her as a “little sister.”

Athletes and celebrities have felt the same type of connection to Taylor in speaking out and demanding justice on her behalf. LeBron James wore a red ball cap to the Los Angeles Lakers‘ playoff opener with the words “Make America arrest the cops who killed Breonna Taylor.” Oprah Winfrey had Taylor’s face put on the cover of O magazine and put up 26 billboards in Louisville calling for the officers to be arrested. WNBA players have dedicated the season to Taylor, wearing her name on the back of their jerseys.

Brown might not hold the same status as LeBron or Oprah, but he has done as much as anyone to keep Taylor’s memory alive. Participating in the protests was just the start. Brown, who was signed to the Eagles’ active roster from the Chicago Bears‘ practice squad on Tuesday, plans to wear Taylor’s name on the back of his helmet, as the NFL is allowing players to display such decals. Four of his former Atlanta Falcons teammates — Grady Jarrett, Jaylinn Hawkins, Sharrod Neasman, and Blidi Wreh-Wilson — also chose to wear Taylor’s name. Brown said although wearing her name means a lot, it would mean even more to see Taylor’s memory make a long-lasting impact on everyday society.

“It’s moving forward, everywhere,” Brown said. “That’s what I’m pushing for: a new day, a new world.”

Getting answers

The FBI call is aimed at establishing an open dialogue between law enforcement and concerned citizens.

Robert Brown, the special agent in charge of Louisville’s FBI field office, gained respect for Brown a few years ago. A framed picture of the family of Dequante Hobbs, a 7-year-old Louisville boy who was killed by a stray bullet in 2017, sits in the FBI office. The family is holding a No. 7 Rams jersey with “Hobbs” on the back. The jersey was donated by Jamon Brown when he played in Los Angeles.

“It’s helpful to have leaders like Jamon Brown setting an example and saying that, ‘We have a right to answers that we seek, and there’s a way to go about showing support and ensuring that we do have reform,'” special agent Brown said in a phone interview.

“And for someone like Jamon to come back and want to be involved in the lives of the youth is unusual. You don’t see that as often as we should.”

Jamon Brown puts on football camps yearly to connect with Louisville’s youth. He orchestrated a street-cleanup effort one morning after the Taylor protests. And he helped pay the funeral expenses for a 1-month-old child who died in Louisville after being hit by his father in a post-video game tirade.

“Jamon is an amazing attribute to Louisville,” said Amanda Mills, founder of the Southend Street Angels, a Louisville-based organization that helps the homeless. “He inspires many and gives hope to those who may not believe anything is possible.”

Standing together

On one of the first days he protested in early June, Brown said he had a confrontation with a white police officer in a parking lot off Louisville’s Shelbyville Road. Brown had joined about 30 others to protest on behalf of Taylor. But the officer, according to Brown, threatened to arrest him and others for trespassing.

“That offended me,” Brown said. “We hadn’t even begun to protest yet. We could have said we were just there as customers if those were private businesses there. But he jumped to a conclusion before even knowing.

“At one point, I was chest to chest with the officer. I was slightly nervous because with everything going on, you don’t know what could have transpired. From that point, I knew I was going to stop to bring awareness to the bigger matter: to push Breonna Taylor’s story.”

Brown hasn’t had any second thoughts about his passionate stance toward this cause. Before being released by the Falcons on Aug. 24, he spoke to Atlanta coach Dan Quinn about his activism. He informed Quinn about possibly being arrested during a protest, as Houston Texans wide receiver Kenny Stills and 86 others were when they were protesting at Attorney General Cameron’s home. Stills initially was charged with felony intimidation, but the charges were dropped.

While Brown is focused on football and providing veteran depth for the Eagles, he said he knows his mission of achieving justice for Taylor is far from complete. In an Aug. 11 call organized by Christopher 2X, Brown spoke to Louisville Mayor Greg Fischer on how to implement measures outside of the new “Breonna’s Law,” which now prohibits no-knock police warrants.

Brown has an even bolder future plan to inspire change in his hometown. He is seriously considering running for mayor after football. He graduated for Louisville with a degree in justice administration.

“I’m potentially trying to be the president,” he said. “I’m going to shoot for the stars and land on the moon.”

Before Brown hits the campaign trail, he wants to see a ruling in the Taylor case beyond a multimillion-dollar financial settlement. Even if he doesn’t find the answers he seeks from the FBI, Brown said it won’t deter him from fighting for justice. It won’t stop his quest for equality.

“I’m alive during times that I read in history books: protests, that’s stuff I’ve watched on movies, not outside my front door,” Brown said. “That’s how real it is. That’s why we’ve got to wake up. White people, you have to wake up.

“It’s either we’re standing together or we’re falling apart.”

Source link

Continue Reading

NFL

Rams’ Robert Woods gets 4-year, $65 million contract extension

Published

on

The Los Angeles Rams and receiver Robert Woods have agreed to terms on a four-year, $65 million extension, including $32 million guaranteed, a source told ESPN. The contract has a $68 million maximum value.

On Thursday, a day before Woods and the Rams agreed to terms, Rams coach Sean McVay said an extension would be done “very shortly,” while Woods expressed hope it would be completed before a Week 2 matchup against the Philadelphia Eagles at Lincoln Financial Field on Sunday.

“Just praying that it gets done on time and really just trying to go out there and execute what I do on the field and let my play do the talking for me,” Woods said. “Which it has.”

Woods outplayed the five-year, $34 million deal he originally signed with the Rams in 2017, and the deal was expanded to $39 million through performance and a conversion of his base salary.

Over the past three seasons, Woods ranks among the top 11 NFL receivers in receptions, receiving yards and yards after catch. He produced consecutive 1,000-yard receiving seasons in 2018 and 2019 and last season led all NFL receivers with 577 yards after the catch. In a Week 1 20-17 victory over the Dallas Cowboys on Sunday, Woods had six receptions for 105 yards.

His deal is the latest in a flurry of extensions the Rams have completed over the past two weeks. Two days before the season opener, cornerback Jalen Ramsey signed a record-setting five-year, $105 million extension that included $71.2 million guaranteed at signing, the most lucrative contract for a defensive back in NFL history. A day later, wide receiver Cooper Kupp signed a three-year, $48 million extension.

When asked if he grew concerned that the Rams might not have the resources to extend him following Ramsey’s and Kupp’s deals, Woods smiled. “This is a billion dollar industry. I feel like there’s always money,” he said, before joking, “especially with Denver doing well — the Nuggets. There’s a little bit of money somewhere.”

Rams owner Stan Kroenke also owns the Nuggets, who are appearing in the Western Conference finals of the NBA playoffs.

McVay said he spoke with Woods following Kupp’s extension, reiterating his desire to keep Woods — whom he called a pillar of the offense — long term.

“[McVay] just kind of put his arm around me and said he’s happy to have me here, been a true competitor since I stepped on his team,” said Woods, who turned 28 in April. “He kind of just reassured me that this deal would be taken care of this week, and really have no other concerns. We take each other’s word, we believe in it, we go forward and we’re locked on to get this thing done and look forward to Philadelphia.”

Woods previously was scheduled to earn $5 million this season, and his contract was set to expire at the end of the 2021 season.

A second-round pick in 2013 by Bills, Woods played four seasons in Buffalo where he had 2,451 receiving yards and 12 touchdowns. Since joining the Rams, Woods has caught 238 passes for 3,239 yards and 13 touchdowns. He also has rushed for 298 yards and two scores.

Source link

Continue Reading

NFL

Packers’ Aaron Jones still plans to do Lambeau Leap without fans in stands

Published

on

GREEN BAY, Wis. — Aaron Jones isn’t going to stop Lambeau Leaping just because the Green Bay Packers won’t have any fans in the stands, and he won’t stop listening to contract offers even though he didn’t get a deal done on the eve of the season, like fellow 2017 draft class running backs Dalvin Cook and Alvin Kamara did.

Jones and the Packers got their first look Friday at how Lambeau Field will be configured for Sunday’s home opener against the Detroit Lions. The team practiced in the stadium, which has the first eight rows of bleachers covered with signage and advertisements during the coronavirus pandemic.

“You’ll definitely still see a Lambeau Leap from me, probably right on one of those tarps,” Jones said after practice on Friday. “Just gotta pick which one, or wherever I score at or the location I’m at it’s gonna be that one. Definitely different seeing it, though, replacing the fans and just the tarp. Definitely not the Lambeau we’re used to.”

Jones is one of the most likely Packers to get the chance for a Lambeau Leap, considering he tied for the NFL lead with 19 touchdowns last season. He scored once last week at Minnesota in the Packers’ Week 1 win, when he rushed for 66 yards on 16 carries.

But is he one of the most likely Packers to get a contract extension?

They signed nose tackle Kenny Clark to a four-year, $70 extension in August. Clark, who suffered a groin injury against the Vikings, has been ruled out against the Lions. Jones is one of four other starters with expiring contracts, including All-Pro left tackle David Bakhtiari, center Corey Linsley and cornerback Kevin King.

The Packers and Bakhtiari were about $4 million per year apart on a deal before the season, according to a source familiar the negotiations. Bakhtiari is seeking to match or exceed the $22 million per year that Houston’s Laremy Tunsil makes as the NFL’s highest-paid tackle.

The Packers also have been talking to Jones about a contract extension since last spring but have not been able to get a deal done. Jones is making $2.133 million in the final year of his rookie deal. Last weekend, both Cook and Kamara signed extensions. The Vikings gave Cook a five-year, $63 million extension, while the Saints extended Kamara for five years and $75 million.

When asked what he thought about those deals, Jones said: “Just congratulations to those guys. They’re just helping out all the running backs on the market. So big kudos and congrats to those guys. It’s very well deserved to them.”

Jones, a fifth-round pick, had a breakout season last year with 1,558 total yards from scrimmage. He tied Carolina’s Christian McCaffrey for the NFL touchdown lead.

Jones said he’s not closing the door on the possibility of still getting a deal done during the season.

“I’m definitely open to getting something done whenever,” he said. “But like I said, that’s not my main focus. Just gonna continue to focus on football and helping this team bring in the wins, as many as possible.”

Source link

Continue Reading

Trending