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Toronto Blue Jays right-handed pitcher Marcus Stroman has right shoulder inflammation

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DUNEDIN, Fla. — Toronto Blue Jays right-hander Marcus Stroman has undergone an MRI that found inflammation in his throwing shoulder.

Stroman expects to resume throwing in the next three to five days.

“I know that I’ll be back, hopefully the very beginning of the season,” Stroman said.

Stroman said the MRI showed that his shoulder is structurally fine.

“Super clean, so I was happy with that,” Stroman said. “Just a bit of inflammation. It’s something that I could probably get through if I needed to get through it. This is something that I rather deal with now, get it out now rather than something that lingers throughout the year.”

Stroman went 13-9 with a 3.09 ERA last year. He struck out 164, two shy of his career high, and walked 62 in 201 innings.

Stroman, 26, is eligible for free agency after the 2020 season. He says he is open to negotiating a multiyear contract.

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World Series 2020 — Will Dodgers be OK if Dustin May, Tony Gonsolin don’t contribute more?

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ARLINGTON, Texas — The Los Angeles Dodgers were three days removed from a taxing seventh game of the National League Championship Series and needed Tony Gonsolin to give them as much as he could as their opener in Game 2 of the World Series on Wednesday night. He provided four outs, but allowed a home run to the second batter he faced.

With the deficit at only a run and two outs in the top of the fourth, the Dodgers needed Dustin May to keep the game close and bridge the gap to their high-leverage relievers. He was charged with three earned runs and exited before the start of the sixth.

The Dodgers cycled through seven pitchers in their 6-4 loss to the Tampa Bay Rays, evening the Fall Classic at one game apiece.

Given the state of their pitching heading in, a loss like this might have been expected. But it also reinforced a problem that could haunt the Dodgers in what remains of this final round — May and Gonsolin, the two young starters counted on to be multi-dimensional weapons in October, haven’t been effective enough. And whether it’s execution or inexperience or a product of their unconventional usage is anyone’s guess.

“I still trust them, I still believe in them, and they just have to make pitches,” Dodgers manager Dave Roberts said. “We’ll look at the video and see what we can do better at, but they’re still gonna need to get big outs for us.”

May, 23, and Gonsolin, 26, combined to produce a 2.46 ERA in a combined 102⅔ innings during the regular season, placing themselves squarely in the thick of a deep field for the National League Rookie of the Year Award. Since then, they have been charged with 13 earned runs on 15 hits and 13 walks in 16⅔ innings in the postseason and haven’t come anywhere close to a traditional five-day schedule.

When Gonsolin took the ball for Game 2 of the NL Championship Series — in place of Clayton Kershaw, who was scratched that morning because of back spasms — it marked his first appearance in 17 days. He was charged with five runs in 4⅓ innings. Five days later, he came into the top of the second in Game 7, gave up a leadoff homer to Dansby Swanson, then allowed the first three batters to reach in the fourth and was taken out. Three days after that, he opened Game 2 of the World Series.

May was effective as a multi-inning reliever early in the postseason, compiling three scoreless innings in the NL Division Series against the Padres and getting five outs late in Game 1 of the NLCS. But he gave up a run in each of his two innings as an opener in Game 5 and allowed the first three batters to reach as an opener in Game 7. Three days later, he was coming out of the bullpen again.

“It’s a big ask, to be quite frank,” Roberts said. “Right now, with the off-days, every team is gonna go down a starter, so that’s one thing. And so people have to adjust to certain roles. And when you’re talking about playing seven days in a row and how you can get as many outs as you can in the CS — yeah, these guys are in uncharted territory. Credit to them — they’re not making any excuses. They expect themselves to make pitches.”

The Dodgers traded Kenta Maeda, let Hyun-Jin Ryu and Rich Hill depart via free agency, and lost David Price after he decided to opt out of the 2020 season. And yet they still sported the second-best rotation ERA in the majors during the regular season. May, with his triple-digit sinkers, and Gonsolin, with his nasty sliders, were a major reason for that. They came on so strong that the Dodgers felt comfortable plucking from their starting-pitching depth before the non-waiver trade deadline, sending clubhouse favorite Ross Stripling to the Toronto Blue Jays so that he could finally solidify a spot in a major league rotation.

But May and Gonsolin haven’t come close to resembling the postseason weapons the Dodgers were hoping they would be.

On Tuesday, Brandon Lowe, who entered with a .107/.180/.161 slash line this postseason, homered off each of them. With Julio Urias saved for Game 4, Clayton Kershaw scheduled for Game 5 and Walker Buehler lined up to take the ball in Games 3 and 7, May and Gonsolin will likely continue on in uncertainty.

They’ll need to adapt quickly.

“It’s different, certainly,” Roberts said. “But I still, we still, need those guys to get important outs going forward for us to win this thing.”

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Follow live: Bellinger, Dodgers seek 2-0 series lead

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Los Angeles Dodgers’ Game 1 win of World Series draws record-low viewers

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ARLINGTON, Texas — The Los Angeles Dodgers‘ victory over the Tampa Bay Rays in Game 1 drew a record-low audience of television viewers for a World Series game.

Los Angeles’ 8-3 win received a 5.1 rating and was seen by an average of 9,195,000 viewers on Fox from 8:06 p.m. to 11:41 p.m. EDT on Tuesday night, Nielsen Media Research said Wednesday.

The previous low had been set the only other time the Rays were in the World Series, when their 5-4 loss to Philadelphia in Game 3 in 2008 was viewed by an average of 9,836,000 that Oct. 25, a Saturday night.

Until now, the low for a Game 1 had been San Francisco’s 7-1 win over Kansas City on Oct. 21, 2012, viewed by an average of 12,191,000 on a Tuesday night.

Washington’s 5-4 victory over Houston in last year’s opener was seen by an average of 12,283,000 on Oct. 22, also a Tuesday night.

Still, Fox won the prime-time evening with its best performance on a Tuesday night since Game 6 of last year’s World Series.

The rating is the percentage of television households tuned in to a broadcast.

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