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INDIANAPOLIS — Frank Reich is ready to embrace being the backup option again.

He spent the majority of his 14-year NFL playing career as a backup quarterback. And he’s the Indianapolis Colts‘ second choice for head coach after Josh McDaniels reneged on his agreement at the very last minute.

“The backup role has suited me well in my career,” Reich said as he drew a roomful of laughs during his introductory news conference at Lucas Oil Stadium on Tuesday.

Reich replaces Chuck Pagano, who was fired after six seasons, and McDaniels. The Colts announced that McDaniels had agreed to become coach of the Colts early on Feb. 6, only to have him call general manager Chris Ballard later that day to tell him he was remaining as offensive coordinator of the New England Patriots.

“We don’t always choose what happens to us, but what we get a chance to do is choose how we react to it,” Ballard said. “I really believe that’s what shows what we’re made of. I can’t be more proud of our organization, the city of Indy and how they’ve handled this last week. Can’t be any more proud of our new head coach Frank Reich.”

Ballard had Reich on his initial list of nearly 10 candidates back in December, but Reich didn’t make the general manager’s top-five list.

“I thought about it after I got done interviewing him. I go, ‘My Lord, what was I thinking?’ You talk to people,” Ballard said. “You make your list. You don’t panic.”

Having McDaniels back out of the job ended up helping Reich because he told his agent he wasn’t going to interview for any openings while Philadelphia was still in the playoffs. Reich wanted his focus to be strictly on getting the offensive game plan together so that the Eagles would be prepared for each playoff game. Ballard interviewed Reich on Feb. 9, the day after the Eagles had their Super Bowl celebration in Philadelphia.

“I want to first off acknowledge and thank the Philadelphia Eagles organization for allowing me to be part of a team and a journey that did something special for the Philadelphia Eagles,” Reich said. “But today is a new chapter. Today is a new chapter and I could not be more excited. … My first coaching job, first as an intern and eventually as a quality control coach and then as a quarterback coach to get my start. What better way to get started and there could not be a better way to finish it than right here in this great city.”

Reich spent the past two seasons as offensive coordinator of the Eagles. Philadelphia went from 22nd in offense during Reich’s first season to seventh this past season. The Eagles scored 41 points to beat the Patriots in Super Bowl LII despite not having starting quarterback Carson Wentz, who tore his ACL on Dec. 10, 2017.

Reich began his coaching career in 2006, eight years after he retired from playing. He spent two seasons as a coaching intern under former Colts head coach Tony Dungy. Reich progressed to being an offensive staff assistant with coach Jim Caldwell in 2008. Then Reich was Peyton Manning’s quarterback coach from 2009-10 before coaching Reggie Wayne and the rest of the wide receivers in 2011. Reich was also offensive coordinator and quarterbacks coach with the Chargers and receivers coach with the Arizona Cardinals.

Reich, who will call plays on offense for the Colts, is taking over an Indianapolis team that finished with a 4-12 record in 2017 and has missed the playoffs three straight years. The Colts will have the No. 3 overall pick in the draft and face the uncertainty of not knowing when quarterback Andrew Luck will return from the right shoulder injury that caused him to miss the entire 2017 season.

“One person at a time, one detail at a time, one player at a time and one game at a time,” Reich said. “As the head coach, the vision is simple and it’s clear, that every time we step on the field to compete, there will be four marks that will mark our team. The first one is that we will be the toughest … both mentally and physically. … Secondly, we will be the most disciplined team. … Thirdly, we’re going to be the most prepared team. … Fourth, we’re going to be the most united team. We’re going to be a close team. It’s going to be built around trust, respect and love.”

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Quinton Dunbar, Detroit Lions reach 1-year deal

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Veteran defensive back Quinton Dunbar is signing a one-year deal with the Detroit Lions, his agency, Elite Loyalty Sports, said Monday.

Dunbar joins the Lions after an injury-plagued season with the Seattle Seahawks, who added him last March only to see him play in six games — all starts — because of a knee problem that required season-ending surgery.

Dunbar, 28, finished 2020 with one interception and five passes defended.

Lions general manager Brad Holmes had said the secondary was an area of focus for his team, which also signed free-agent cornerback Corn Elder last week.

“The corner position — and I can say it with more than just the corner position — is a position that we’ll continue to address now throughout the entire process, up until the draft and even after the draft, if need be,” Holmes told reporters last week, according to The Detroit News. “But it’s definitely a position that is not gonna be overlooked or ignored. It is a young group that we have now. I really like the group that we have, in terms of the youth and the upside. … But that is a position that we’ll continue to look to address now and through the draft.”

The Seahawks acquired Dunbar for a fifth-round pick in a March trade with the Washington Football Team. He missed most of the offseason program and the start of training camp while dealing with armed robbery charges that were later dropped due to insufficient evidence.

Dunbar made 25 starts over five seasons with Washington, which signed him as an undrafted free agent out of Florida in 2015. He began his NFL career as a wide receiver, then was converted to cornerback as a rookie. He has 10 career interceptions and a sack in his six seasons.

Washington signed Dunbar to a three-year, $10.5 million contract after the 2017 season. The Seahawks inherited the final year of that deal, which paid Dunbar roughly $3.34 million in 2020.

ESPN’s Brady Henderson contributed to this report.

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Minnesota Vikings CB Jeff Gladney turns self in on assault charge

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Minnesota Vikings cornerback Jeff Gladney turned himself in to the Dallas County Jail on Monday following a family violence assault charge, according to the Dallas Police Department.

Police said the charge stems from an incident on Friday when Gladney allegedly assaulted a 22-year-old woman.

“We are aware of Jeff’s arrest and are gathering additional information,” the Vikings said in a statement Monday. “We take this matter very seriously, as the reported allegations are extremely disturbing. At this time we will have no further comment.”

Gladney, 24, was a first-round draft pick out of TCU in 2020 and started 15 games for Minnesota last season.

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What trading for Sam Darnold means for the Carolina Panthers’ future

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CHARLOTTE, N.C. — The Carolina Panthers‘ carousel of ways to upgrade from quarterback Teddy Bridgewater landed on Sam Darnold.

The Panthers traded for the third pick of the 2018 draft after earlier this offseason losing out to the Los Angeles Rams in a deal for quarterback Matthew Stafford.

They also faced the possibility of being shut out of getting one of the top quarterbacks at No. 8 in the upcoming draft after San Francisco traded with the Miami Dolphins for the No. 3 pick, meaning the top three picks (Jaguars, Jets, 49ers) likely will be signal-callers.

So the Panthers turned to Darnold, giving up a sixth-round pick this year and second- and fourth-round picks in 2022 for a quarterback the Jets had, for all practical purposes, given up on.

What does the deal mean for the Panthers? Will it turn them into a playoff contender and allow Darnold to live up to the expectations cast upon him coming out of USC? Let’s examine:

How much does the addition of Darnold improve the Panthers?

This isn’t Tom Brady going to the Tampa Bay Buccaneers, so don’t pencil in plans for a Carolina run at the Super Bowl just yet. This is settling for the best the Panthers could get after other options disappeared.

Will Darnold be better than Bridgewater, who was 0-8 last season in games in which he had the ball on the final possession with a chance to tie or win? The simple answer is the Panthers can’t be much worse off.

From the perspective of Carolina general manager Scott Fitterer, Darnold is an upgrade. He’s a player with good mobility and leadership that he liked in 2018 coming out of college.

Fitterer said if Darnold turns into what he believes he can be, “for this price, it’s definitely worth the gamble.”

Note, he said gamble.

For Darnold, this means finally being surrounded by a supporting cast that can help him reach his potential and an offensive coordinator in Joe Brady, who proved with Joe Burrow at LSU he can turn a good player into a great one.

Darnold will have no excuses after this season, getting to play with Christian McCaffrey, arguably the best all-purpose back in the league. He’ll also have solid wide receivers in DJ Moore and Robby Anderson, who both topped 1,000 yards receiving in 2020. Darnold is familiar with Anderson, who was his most dangerous receiver in his first two seasons with the Jets.

The Panthers upgraded some at tight end by signing Dan Arnold in free agency, and they’re probably not finished there with the draft a possibility to upgrade further.

The Panthers plan to discuss exercising the QB’s fifth-year option with Darnold’s agent, per league source, which means it likely is to happen. That would give him in essence two years to prove himself in Carolina.

This likely is a bigger win for Darnold than for the Panthers, who were initially looking for more of a veteran presence to make them a playoff contender this season. If the gamble pays off, it’s a win-win for both.

What does this mean for Bridgewater?

That his days with the Panthers are essentially over — even though Joe Brady called him a franchise quarterback early last season. Trading him is the best option, with Bridgewater set to count $23 million against the 2021 cap, but that will be a tough sell. He can be released with a post-June 1 designation and save $7.9 million, but Carolina would take a $15 million hit in dead money this year and $5 million in 2022.

Worst case, Bridgewater will remain on the roster and offer his veteran expertise. Fitterer didn’t rule out that, but he didn’t exactly endorse it.

Bridgewater has always been a team player and overcame a career-threatening knee injury in Minnesota in 2016 to become a starter again. If anyone can handle being a backup, he can.

The best scenario for both parties would be for Bridgewater to restructure his deal to make him more tradeable. Fitterer said he has talked to Bridgewater and his agent and they’re all on the same page, but he didn’t clearly define that page.

“We’re going to find the right place for him, whether it’s here or someplace else,” Fitterer said.

How does this alter the Panthers’ draft approach, especially at No. 8 overall?

It would be stunning now if the Panthers used that pick on a quarterback with Will Grier and P.J. Walker also on the roster, although Fitterer didn’t rule out Carolina drafting a quarterback should the right player fall to them.

What this trade does is give them the flexibility to upgrade at possibly offensive tackle or tight end — two big needs — if Oregon’s Penei Sewell or Florida’s Kyle Pitts falls to them. That would also give Darnold a better chance to succeed and upgrade the overall offense long term.

“He’s highly competitive,” Fitterer said of Darnold. “He’s smart enough. I really like what he can bring to us with his ability to push the ball down the field.”

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