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MINNEAPOLIS — Super Bowl LII just ended. The Philadelphia Eagles are still celebrating. But that’s not what matters here.

You wake this morning to face a stretch of seven painful, football-free months. The 2018 season is more than a half-year away, and you’re already aching to see what happens next.

We’ve got you covered.

For the third year in a row, we have looked into our crystal ball and foreseen many of the key events of the next NFL season, so you don’t have to wait. As you know from reading this column the past two years, all 10 of these predictions are absolutely, 100 percent guaranteed to come true.

Now, get to reading while I excuse myself to go scrub the internet clean of the past two years’ editions of this column. Here are 10 bold predictions for the 2018 NFL season:


1. Free-agent quarterback Kirk Cousins signs with the Jets

It’s a six-year, $186 million contract with $100 million in guarantees, including $75 million fully guaranteed at signing. The Jets outbid the Browns, Jaguars and division-rival Bills for Cousins, who becomes the highest-paid player in NFL history after hitting the market following two seasons as Washington’s franchise player. He then leads the Jets to a 10-6 record and a wild-card playoff spot.

2. Odell Beckham Jr. sits out at least one regular-season game

Beckham’s contract situation is going to be a tricky one for the Giants, who hold a 2018 option on him and aren’t in a hurry to give him the extension he wants coming off an ankle injury that cost him almost the entire 2017 season. Uninterested in taking the field without a new deal, Beckham stays in California throughout training camp and, Aaron Donald-style, sits out the season opener in protest. New coach Pat Shurmur and quarterback Eli Manning continue to insist they can get by with Sterling Shepard and Evan Engram as their top receiving options — and are wrong.

3. There are a least five new playoff teams, including the Jets, Chargers, Raiders, Packers and 49ers

Jimmy Garoppolo helps San Francisco snag a wild-card spot with a fast start and a furious finish. Aaron Rodgers returns to put Green Bay back where it belongs. Philip Rivers has one more big year left in him, and this time the Chargers don’t start 0-4. Jon Gruden’s return revitalizes a Raiders team that should have been better than it was in 2017. And you already heard about the Jets.

The two AFC teams that repeat as playoff participants are the Steelers and Patriots, of course. The crystal ball is fuzzier in the NFC, where it can’t tell yet whether the Rams can repeat or the Cowboys can bounce back.

4. Le’Veon Bell signs a contract extension with the Steelers

Bell’s new deal is heavily front-loaded but guarantees him more than $25 million and averages more than $12 million per year — not the mega back/receiver deal of which Bell has been dreaming, but still pushing the top of the running back market well above where it is right now. A 2017 training camp holdout, Bell shows up on time for everything in 2018 and helps drive Pittsburgh’s offense where it needs to go.

5. Josh Allen is the first pick in the April’s draft … but he doesn’t start a game in 2018

The Browns take the big Wyoming quarterback No. 1 overall but sit him for at least a year behind AJ McCarron, whom they acquire when they lose out on Cousins. McCarron doesn’t love having to play with a first-round pick looking over his shoulder, but his reunion with coach Hue Jackson — his former offensive coordinator in Cincinnati — makes it more palatable. Besides, if you can win a couple of games with the Browns, think of how attractive that would look to future employers.

6. Six more teams change head coaches after the 2018 season

Those teams are: Baltimore, Cleveland, Denver, Washington, Tampa Bay and Seattle, where 67-year-old Pete Carroll decides to retire after a second straight season without a playoff appearance.

Philadelphia enters the season as one of the Super Bowl favorites, even though the NFC East hasn’t had a repeat champion in 14 years. Questions about Wentz’s return from a torn ACL haunt the offseason, but Foles puts them to rest with a hot start that has the team in position to repeat as division champs once Wentz is healed and back in the lineup. A soft September schedule that includes the Buccaneers, Colts and Giants helps.

8. Andrew Luck returns and plays all 16 games for the Colts

Luck looks like a pretty good candidate to beat out J.J. Watt, David Johnson, Aaron Rodgers and others in one of the most crowded Comeback Player of the Year races in history.

9. The NFL changes the catch rule to appease fans and increase scoring

Seriously, there’s no way the league likes seeing touchdowns taken off the board by a rule that confuses and infuriates its fan base like no other. Expect a big competition committee discussion this offseason that results in a great deal more leniency in determining whether a player completed the catch. It’s probably too much to expect common sense to rule the day and for the NFL to relax the extent to which it uses its infernal replay review system, but new guidelines will result in fewer catches being overturned into noncatches because they didn’t “survive the ground.”

10. The Saints will beat the Steelers in Super Bowl LIII

Frustrated divisional-round losers this season, New Orleans and Pittsburgh put the past behind them quickly and reach the Super Bowl in Atlanta. It’s the second straight year one of the Super Bowl teams has a 40-year-old quarterback, and Drew Brees doesn’t disappoint, hitting Michael Thomas for the game-winning touchdown pass with 24 seconds left on the clock.

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Miami Dolphins tight ends Mike Gesicki, Cethan Carter, Adam Shaheen go on COVID-19 reserve list

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MIAMI — Mike Gesicki and two other Miami Dolphins tight ends have been placed on the NFL’s COVID-19 reserve list.

Also sidelined were Cethan Carter and Adam Shaheen.

They were put on the list as close contacts, sources told ESPN’s Adam Schefter on Sunday, after Dolphins co-offensive coordinator and tight ends coach George Godsey, who has been vaccinated, tested positive for COVID-19 and was sent home.

Co-offensive coordinator Eric Studesville will run the Dolphins’ offense in Godsey’s absence.

The Dolphins have had four training camp practices and were off Sunday.

Miami has four other tight ends in camp.

Gesicki’s 703 yards receiving in 2020 ranked fourth among NFL tight ends and were the second most in a season by a Dolphins tight end.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

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Tampa Bay Buccaneers to hold Olympics watch party in support of hurdler Anna Cockrell, sister of CB Ross Cockrell

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TAMPA, Fla. — The Detroit Lions aren’t the only team holding Olympic track and field watch parties this training camp. The Tampa Bay Buccaneers will also hold one at 7:55 a.m. Monday morning — just moments before taking the practice field — to watch Anna Cockrell, sister of cornerback Ross Cockrell, compete in Semifinal 3 of the women’s 400-meter hurdles.

Cockrell, who was a key reserve on the Bucs’ Super Bowl winning team last year, is elated his younger sibling gets a chance to live out her dream, even if he can’t be there to witness it.

“She’s worked hard her entire life for this, and I’m just super excited for her,” Cockrell said. “She’s an absolute animal on the track. I have a ton of respect for what she does.”

The four-time All-American at Southern Cal won NCAA track titles in June in the 100- and 400-meter hurdles. She then turned in the performance of her life at the Olympic Trials, catapulting herself from fifth place in the final turn to reach third place — the final spot on the Olympic team — and finished with a personal best time of 53.70 seconds.

Then on Friday, she put up a 55.37 in Heat 1 behind Colombia’s Melissa Gonzalez (55.32), the wife of Lions backup quarterback David Blough, and Ukraine’s Viktoriya Tkachuk, (54.80).

“One of the things I say to Anna is – she’s a five-star, she was a five-star recruit coming out of high school,” Cockrell said. “So I just tell her, ‘Be a five-star. Just breathe and do it. … Just breath, do it and let your light shine.'”

The Cockrell siblings have been able to talk on the phone and trade text messages since she’s been in Tokyo. On Saturday night, they exchanged grumblings over the weather. Japan’s sweltering heat wave and stifling humidity caught the young sibling off-guard, while the older Cockrell had just donned pads for the first time in a Tampa Bay training camp.

“We have good conversations about it, how to deal with performing at a high level,” Cockrell, who joined the Bucs as a free agent midway through last season, said. “Being the older brother, I just love giving her as much advice as I can. I’m learning to listen more. It’s one of the things I know I gotta work on with her. We just have good conversations. At the same time, we respect what each other [does] and when we need to give each other that space, we give each other that space.”

The postponement of the Olympic Games due to the pandemic meant Anna would miss her senior year of competition at Southern Cal. Cockrell called it the “longest year of his sister’s life” but said it helped her rejuvenate physically and mentally.

In a tearful post-race interview at trials, she opened up about battling depression in 2019 and wanting to quit the sport, which she has since gone into greater detail about due to an increased focus on athlete mental health at the Olympics.

“She’s very talented,” Cockrell said. “She’s a very beautiful person, inside and out.”

“We’re just tremendously thankful. I think the whole family – all of us,” Cockrell said. ‘We thank God every day, every time we talk to each other. We just have – it’s hard to explain it – all these things happening at once.”

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How the Falcons use Bill Walsh fellowship to emphasize coaching diversity

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Tessa Grossman was about to get into her mother’s white Mazda on May 3 when a notification popped up on her cell phone. Home in California for a couple of weeks after the spring semester of grad school at Illinois State, she saw whom the email was from and started getting nervous before she even opened it.

Five days earlier, she completed a first interview with the Atlanta Falcons for a Bill Walsh Diversity Coaching Fellowship during training camp. Her interviewers said they’d be in touch. This email from Sarah Hogan, Atlanta’s assistant director of coaching operations, could be good news. Or bad.

It was good. Atlanta wanted a second interview.

“I remember sitting down in the car and going, ‘Oh my god, the Falcons just emailed me for a second interview,'” Grossman said. “Basically, like, holy s—, this is crazy.”

She took a deep breath. She had to plan to impress one more time. The email said to pick an interview time and Marquice Williams, Atlanta’s special teams coordinator, would reach out with details.

What started as a cold email to Hogan on April 10 introducing herself and informing Hogan she had applied for the fellowship led to Grossman’s selection as one of eight finalists for four internship spots in a program designed to increase the number of NFL minority coaches.

Processes differ from team to team, but all across the country calls and emails like this occurred for candidates for the introduction to the NFL through participation in training camps or offseason workouts.

It’s a competitive gig — often, like Grossman, potential fellows have full-time or graduate assistant jobs in college or high school. Venessa Hutchinson, who helps run the program for the NFL, said approximately 1,000 people applied this year.

Most years, the NFL has full participation. In Atlanta, this meant a comprehensive interview process run by Hogan and Williams, which whittled the Falcons’ in-house database of 50 applicants to the four they selected: Grossman (strength and conditioning), Erick Capetillo (tight ends/running backs), Darryl Jackson (special teams) and Cliff Matthews (outside linebackers), a former Falcons player.

“The Falcons have been a team that has always been at the forefront,” Hutchinson said. “Even when the old regime was there, they were bringing in female coaches and things like that, a lot earlier than a lot of the other clubs.

“They were always trying to be more progressive.”


In one of her first conversations after head coach Arthur Smith was hired by the Falcons this offseason, Hogan brought up the Bill Walsh program. She had been instrumental in its implementation under former coach Dan Quinn and wanted to continue.

She’d represented the Falcons at league meetings about the fellowship. She had plans. Smith agreed. The process became hers.

Then she met with special team coordinator Williams, who received his NFL start with Bill Walsh fellowships in Chicago and Detroit. Hogan happened to have her database of potential candidates open. Williams asked about it. They discussed his experiences and how it helped his coaching growth.

“Right after that conversation [I told him] that, ‘Hey, I talked to Coach [Smith] and I’m spearheading this thing. I’d love for me and you to do it together,'” Hogan said. “He was all for it. It made it so much better.”

In years past, Hogan had worked with a member of the scouting department. Now, she’d be working with an assistant coach. She also implemented changes. Hogan had suggestions from her prior experience running the program. Williams had ideas from his own Bill Walsh experience.

Together they streamlined the process of name collection and took candidate suggestions from their coaching staff. They scoured the NFL database and did their own research. If someone — like Grossman — reached out cold and showed initiative beyond clicking the Falcons box on the NFL application, they received consideration.

Due to the timing of the program with FBS training camps and wanting fellows to receive the full experience, they decided they wanted one high school coach, one small-college coach, an Ivy League coach and a fourth wild-card spot. They wanted a woman to fill at least one role. Each candidate was logged into Hogan’s tabbed-out, color-coded database containing information for this year and future seasons.

Williams and Hogan communicated regularly through email, text, phone calls and in-person meetings. Any time an idea came up, they fired off a note, working a handful of hours each week for about a month outside of interviews on the program.

Using their metrics, they narrowed down their database to 16 candidates who would receive 25-minute first interviews by phone. From there, they selected eight candidates to participate in Zoom interviews with Hogan and Williams. If he could, Smith would sit in. Otherwise, he’d watch recordings later.

“We wanted someone who is a total go-getter, who would do anything and everything,” Hogan said. “They would wash jerseys. They would pick up equipment. It had to be someone who was really enthusiastic about the whole program and the idea of it and learning.

“Someone who could take what we were teaching them and take it back to their current job. We weren’t necessarily looking for someone just to take the internship to put on their résumé to say that they did it.”

That was important to Hogan and Williams because of how they came up through the NFL.


Hogan grew up around football. Her formative years were spent in Merrick, New York, where her father, Greg Gigantino, was Hofstra’s defensive coordinator. The closest she came to playing or coaching was in eighth grade at Merrick Avenue Middle School, where she and her best friend considered trying out for football after their track season was moved to spring. But they decided not to.

In college at James Madison, she had no intention of working in football. Her father told her he helped land her a job in the football office. She didn’t think anything of it, just that she’d be going to help people they’d known over the years.

At the time, she didn’t know anything about football operations. She thought the only gig for women in sports was athletic training.

“And then I just kind of really liked doing it,” Hogan said.

Hogan interned with the Jets — the team held training camp at Hofstra — and changed her major to sports management and kinesiology. She went to grad school at Georgia State for sports administration and became the director of football operations at Northeastern and then Georgia State.

In 2015, she landed with the Falcons as the coordinator of scouting administration. Eight months later, Quinn made her the coordinator of head coach operations and she’s now essentially the deputy chief of staff assisting Smith and director of coaching operations Brian Griffin.

She works with various staff members to coordinate logistics and put everything together — from rookie travel to the Bill Walsh program.

“We just carry out the head coach’s wishes and make it easy for him to get his agenda and get the team ready to win games,” Hogan said. “That’s my bottom line.”

In working on the fellowship, she was also able to fulfill an objective she adopted from her father: taking interest in younger coaches and trying to match jobs with candidates. It’s what she wanted to do: make a difference behind the scenes, ever since she moved from college to the NFL.


Williams could relate. Had it not been for the Bill Walsh program, he might not be where he is now.

Williams was a defensive line coach at South Dakota in 2013 when he wrote 32 letters — one to each NFL head coach — and mailed them along with a copy of his résumé and his business card.

A Fresno, California, native and former defensive back at the University of Mary in North Dakota, he had few connections to the league. He’d spent time in small colleges — Winona State, Central Oklahoma before South Dakota — when he decided to apply for the fellowship program.

He figured the personal touch could stand out, perhaps catch the eye of application collectors. The extra effort worked. He landed with the Bears in 2013 and 2014 and then in 2015 with the Lions under Jim Caldwell.

Working with the Bears gave him his first exposure to special teams under coordinator Joe DeCamillis. With Caldwell he gained insight into almost everything.

“I learned more about different ways on teaching the values and different ways to practice on presenting certain topics,” Williams said. “Concepts and how to structure a practice, how to structure meetings. And Coach Caldwell did a great job of exposing us to the overall big picture of becoming a servant-leader.”

Before Williams’ Lions internship, Caldwell brought him for a two-hour interview. One hour was to interview as a linebackers coach and the other as a special teams coordinator. Williams thought it was for the internship, but Caldwell treated it like it was for a full-time job.

Essentially, his internship began during the interview, where Caldwell asked about Williams’ approach as a teacher and communicator, quizzed him about his personality, asked how he installed plays and ran practice. He inquired about special teams philosophy and how special teams complements offense and defense.

“That helped me and to this day I still use a lot of the tools that I learned from that interview and then the feedback I got from that interview,” Williams said. “When I interviewed with Coach Smith or whatever organization it may be, my base foundation came from that mock interview with Coach Caldwell.”

In 2016, Williams became the assistant special teams coach with the Chargers and in 2018 was moved to a defensive assistant role. Then he spent two seasons back in Detroit under Matt Patricia as the assistant special teams coach before Smith hired him as his coordinator this year.

It started with the fellowship.

“It was a platform to show who I am as an individual and show what I could bring to the table, but the bigger thing was it gave me the opportunity to learn the game of football,” Williams said. “That’s first and foremost.”


When Williams spoke with Grossman on May 5 to set up final interview parameters, he said half of the 20-minute final interview would be a presentation on anything she wanted. Drawing from a lesson learned from his interview with Caldwell, Williams wanted the candidates to teach him and Hogan something.

“They wanted you to install a play or something that I run in my offense,” Capetillo said. “And that was a little bit exciting, but also nerve-racking.”

Capetillo explained an inside run play his Las Vegas High team uses frequently with him as the head coach. Matthews, the defensive line coach at Reinhardt College, presented on the concepts of blocks defensive linemen might face and how to counter them.

Jackson, the special teams coordinator and defensive backs coach at Brown, did a brief introduction of himself followed by a replica of a directional punt coverage presentation he’d use at a meeting with his players.

Grossman, an Illinois State strength and conditioning graduate assistant, practiced her presentation six times the morning of her May 6 interview. She talked about the concept of cognitive restructuring and the importance of positive self-talk over negative self-talk.

While Capetillo, Matthews and Jackson had years of playing and coaching experience, Grossman had never held a full-time job. She graduated from Dartmouth a year ago, her senior softball season wiped out by the COVID-19 pandemic. She used material from her final presentation for Motivation and Sports last semester — a presentation she got an A for — in her interview with Hogan and Williams.

The four candidates were Hogan and Williams’ first choices, and all four aced their final interviews.

The process worked. Hogan and Williams had their fellows. Williams and Hogan divided the calls to the candidates they chose not to hire — but encouraged them to stay in touch and to apply again next year — and the congratulatory calls.

There were reasons they chose to call the candidates they did: Capetillo was Williams’ college teammate. Matthews had been to Flowery Branch before and Hogan was his liaison when he’d come to watch film. Jackson coached with Hogan’s father. Only Grossman, who reached out to Hutchinson for preparation tips throughout the process, had been unknown to Hogan or Williams prior to the process.


Capetillo, 32, was at his high school’s track practice when Williams called. He stepped aside for a minute and had to contain his excitement. He’d applied for the program before, but this was the furthest he’d gotten in the process.

He already had spoken to his wife — they were high school sweethearts — about the possibility of being away from home for three weeks. His goal, his dream, has been to work for an NFL team. This would be the first step on his path.

After he got off the phone, he quickly called his wife and went back to coaching track to unsuspecting kids who had no idea what just happened to their coach.

Jackson, 52, applied only to the Falcons. His connection with Hogan and his brother living in the Atlanta area made the Falcons an attractive possibility. He’d been part of the internship program before — in 2007 with Jacksonville, 2003 with Detroit and 1999 with Philadelphia. He applied again not because he was looking for a way to the NFL, but to increase his knowledge base. He found out he got the job sitting in his office at Brown.

“It was time for me to branch back out,” Jackson said. “Re-network and learn at the highest level and have an opportunity to listen and work with coaches and players at that level.”

Matthews, 31, was in his suburban Georgia home working on his other passion: cooking. He was in the middle of making collard greens — one of his specialties — when Hogan called. Fancying himself a master chef, he kept cooking. When he hung up, he sat down, told his wife the news and called his head coach at Limestone to tell him.

Grossman, 23, had been told after the interview to expect a call from Thomas Stallworth, Atlanta’s head strength and conditioning coach. They spoke for an hour while Grossman, still on Pacific time, was in her bedroom. At the end, Stallworth let it slip the Falcons were offering her the fellowship — followed by a call five minutes later from Williams making it official.

“It was just really shock at first,” Grossman said. “The whole experience felt like a bit of a fairy tale to be honest.”

She had not expected this in her first attempt at applying, even though she interned with the Rams. Matthews and Capetillo had hoped for this since they entered coaching. For Jackson, it’s a way to keep learning. It’s an opportunity, a chance. All they need to do is look at Williams to understand where it could lead.

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