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PEORIA, Ariz. — During a spring training filled with small, nagging injuries, the Seattle Mariners believe they caught a fortunate break after Felix Hernandez took a line drive off his right arm.

Hernandez said Tuesday he is still very sore after a liner off the bat of the Chicago CubsVictor Caratini hit Hernandez in the right forearm. The injury happened in Hernandez’s first spring training start a day earlier.

X-rays were negative, but Hernandez still had enough swelling in the elbow area after he arrived in the Mariners clubhouse Tuesday morning that he couldn’t fully straighten his arm.

There was initial concern Hernandez had suffered a significant injury. Hernandez went down to a knee, hopped up and walked around in obvious pain. He headed to the dugout with a trainer holding his arm.

The ball hit Hernandez on a tattoo signifying his All-Star Game selection in 2013.

“That hurt real bad. I can’t explain how bad it was. I didn’t feel anything like that before,” Hernandez said.

“I finished the pitch and I saw the ball coming and I said ‘Oh my God.’ And then my brother told me yesterday, ‘Why didn’t you pick the ball up and throw it to first?”’

The ball caught Hernandez just below his right elbow, hitting directly on a star tattoo with ’13’ on the inside, signifying his All-Star Game selection in 2013.

Hernandez was still unable to fully straighten his right arm when he arrived in the clubhouse Tuesday morning because of the swelling in the area around his elbow.

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The MLB teams with the most serious work still to do this offseason

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I write this with great respect for my many friends who are Mets fans: It might be redundant to say they are irrational. It wasn’t surprising, then, that within a few weeks of Steve Cohen being installed as the team’s new owner, some among the Mets’ faithful — their suffering made possible by years of watching the team seemingly aim to finish second in bidding wars — began griping about the lack of a big, bold move.

Never mind that the start of spring training is still many weeks away. Never mind that this winter market was painfully slow to begin with. Never mind that the Mets had already distinguished themselves from the inactivity of other teams by executing two relatively aggressive moves, signing catcher James McCann to a four-year, $40.6 million contract and reliever Trevor May to a two-year, $15.5 million deal.

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Former Oakland Athletics pitcher Dave Stewart bids $115 million on share of Oakland Coliseum

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Former Oakland Athletics pitcher Dave Stewart submitted a $115 million bid to buy the city of Oakland’s share of the Coliseum with plans to develop the site, he told the San Francisco Chronicle.

With both the NBA’s Warriors and NFL’s Raiders leaving the site in recent years, the A’s are the last pro team using the Coliseum. The team has undergone steps to build a new ballpark at Howard Terminal, about seven miles uptown.

The A’s currently own the other half of the Coliseum.

In a Tweet on Saturday night, Stewart, who grew up in the area, said doing “right by our community” is the driving force behind the bid. He told the Chronicle he has ideas of developing the area and potentially building a new stadium there if plans for the Howard Terminal ballpark fall through.

Stewart, 63, played parts of eight seasons in Oakland and helped the team win a World Series in 1989.



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Tri-City ValleyCats suing Major League Baseball, Houston Astros

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TROY, N.Y. — Left in the lurch by minor league contraction, the Tri-City ValleyCats have filed a lawsuit against Major League Baseball and the Houston Astros.

The suit, filed Thursday in New York State Supreme Court, seeks more than $15 million, ValleyCats chairman Doug Gladstone told the Albany Times-Union. The move comes in response to MLB’s decision to drop 42 minor league affiliates.

The ValleyCats played in the now-defunct New York-Penn League, operating as a short-season affiliate of the Astros for 18 seasons.

Gladstone told the Times-Union the loss of the affiliation greatly affected the value of the franchise, which was moved from Pittsfield, Massachusetts, to Troy in 2002 by Gladstone’s late father. It had previously been located in Little Falls, New York.

The ValleyCats won three New York-Penn League championships and drew more than 4,000 fans per game for 11 straight seasons, from 2008-18.

In their most recent season, Tri-City had the third-highest attendance in the 14-team league, averaging more than 3,869. The only two teams that were higher, Brooklyn and Hudson Valley, survived with moves to a new league.

The team is joining the independent Frontier League and will continue to play its home games at Joseph L. Bruno Stadium.

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